Daily Archives: December 8, 2005

THE ACTION UKRAINE REPORT – AUR – Number 613

 
 “THE ACTION UKRAINE REPORT – AUR”
                                An International Newsletter
                                     The Latest, Up-To-Date
                In-Depth Ukrainian News, Analysis, and Commentary

                “Ukrainian History, Culture, Arts, Business, Religion,
    Sports, Government, and Politics, in Ukraine and Around the World”

                            
“THE ACTION UKRAINE REPORT – AUR” – Number 613
Mr. E. Morgan Williams, Publisher and Editor
Washington, D.C., Kyiv, Ukraine, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2005
                        ——–INDEX OF ARTICLES——–
                “Major International News Headlines and Articles”

1.COALITION TO GRADUATE UKRAINE FROM JACKSON-VANIK

                            NOW EXCEEDS 160 MEMBERS
                     Join the Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition
               U.S. House urged to take immediate legislative action
Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition
Steven Pifer & William Miller, Co-chair
Washington, D.C., Thursday, December 8, 2005

2. JACKSON-VANIK GRADUATION COALITION MEMBERSHIP LIST
                       Over 160 Members as of December 7, 2005

Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition
Steven Pifer & William Miller, Co-chair
Washington, D.C., Thursday, December 8, 2005
3SEC OF STATE RICE WRITES CONG CHARLES RANGEL THAT
      ADMINISTRATION SUPPORTS UKRAINE’S GRADUATION
                       FROM JACKSON-VANIK AMENDMENT
Office of the Secretary of State
U.S. Department of State, Washington, D.C., November 8, 2005

4U.S. STATE SEC RICE CALLS UKRAINE ‘STRATEGIC PARTNER’
        VOICES SUPPORT FOR UKRAINE’S REFORM PROGRAM
Mara D. Bellaby, AP Worldstream
Kiev, Ukraine, Wednesday, December 07, 2005

5.      RICE URGES UKRAINE TO PROMOTE DEMOCRACY
Saul Hudson, Reuters News Service
Kiev, Ukraine, Thursday, December 8, 2005

6RICE EXPRESSES CONCERN IN KIEV OVER RESTRICTIVE
                 DRAFT RUSSIAN LEGISLATION ON NGO’S
Mara D. Bellaby, AP Worldstream
Kiev, Ukraine, Wednesday, Dec 07, 2005

7.      TOP US OFFICIAL MEETS FORMER PM TYMOSHENKO

                      QUIZZED BY UKRAINIAN STUDENTS 
                   Invites Yulia Tymoshenko to the United States
TV 5 Kanal, Kiev, in Ukrainian 1500 gmt 7 Dec 05
BBC Monitoring Service, UK, in English, Wed, Dec 07, 2005

8.   US SECRETARY OF STATE RICE SAYS THE PEOPLE WHO
          LAUNCHED THE ORANGE REVOLUTION NOW NEED
                     TO DELIVER ON THAT REVOLUTION
Anne Gearan, AP Online, Berlin, Germany, Wed, Dec 07, 2005

9.          US STATE SECRETARY RICE PRAISES UKRAINE’S
                 DEMOCRACY, WARNS RUSSIA OVER NGO’S
               USA will grant Ukraine market economy status ‘soon.’

                          US representatives will soon visit Kiev
TV 5 Kanal, Kiev, in Ukrainian 1000 gmt 7 Dec 05
BBC Monitoring Service, UK, in English, Wed, Dec 07, 2005

10. UKRAINE EXPECTS “POSITIVE SIGNALS” AT HONG KONG
           WTO MEETING PRESIDENT YUSHCHENKO STATED
Interfax-Ukraine news agency, Kiev, in Russian 1004 gmt 7 Dec 05
BBC Monitoring Service, UK, in English, Wed, Dec 07, 2005

11   UKRAINE FORMALLY JOINS SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE
                          DEFENSE MINISTERIAL (SEDM)
UPI, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, December 6, 2005

12UKRAINE’S DEFENCE MINISTER MEETS US COUNTERPART
                     DONALD RUMSFELD IN WASHINGTON
Interfax-Ukraine news agency, Kiev, in Russian 1121 gmt 7 Dec 05
BBC Monitoring Service, UK, in English, Wed, Dec 07, 2005

13.  CANADIAN COMPANIES TO REAP NEW OPPORTUNITIES IN
  UKRAINE THROUGH NEW EDC-UKREXIMBANK LINE OF CREDIT
Maple Leaf News, E-ZINE, Vol. 60
Canadian Embassy in Ukraine
Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, December 7, 2005

14FOREIGN BANKS TO LEND MTS’ UKRAINE MOBILE TELEPHONE
             UNIT UMC $150 MILLION TO EXPAND ITS NETWORK
Dow Jones Newswires, Moscow Bureau
Moscow, Russia, Thursday, December 8, 2005 

15.     NEW AES INVESTMENT IN BULGARIAN POWER PLANT
In Bid to Boost Revenue, U.S. Company Makes Bet On Southeastern Europe

        [AES has major investments in two Ukrainian power companies]
By Cristi Cretzan, Dow Jones Newswires
The Wall Street Journal, New York, NY,
Wednesday, December 7, 2005; Page B11

16.                                  WHAT’S IN A NAME?
COMMENT & ANALYSIS: Observer
Financial Times, London, UK, Wed, December 7 2005

17THE PRESIDENT, THE LITTLE GIRL & SHRINERS HOSPITALS
        Nastya is already a hero in her homeland, Ukraine’s Kharkiv region
Rushville Republican, Rushville, Indiana, Tuesday, December 06, 2005

18.    ADOPTED CHILDREN FROM UKRAINE MAKE COUPLE’S

                    HOUSE A HOME IN SOUTH CAROLINA
By Toya Graham, The Associated Press
The Sun News, Myrtle Beach Online
Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Wed, December 7, 2005

19. UKRAINE’S STAR STRIKER CHASING WORLD CUP DREAM
                 For Andriy Shevchenko the big one beckons
AP Worldstream, Kiev,Ukraine, Thu, Dec 08, 2005

20.       UKRAINE PRESIDENT CONDEMNS ANTI-SEMITISM
Press office of President Victor Yushchenko of Ukraine
Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, December 5, 2005

 
21UKRAINIAN JEWISH ACTIVIST ACCUSES GOVERNMENT OF
                DOING LITTLE TO COMBAT ANTI-SEMITISM
AP Worldstream, Kiev, Ukraine, Wednesday, Dec 07, 2005
 
22SECURITY GUARD MELNYCHENKO RETURNS TO UKRAINE
        Will Melnychenko tapes play a role in Ukrainian parliamentary race?
ANALYSIS & COMMENTARY: By Taras Kuzio
Eurasia Daily Monitor, Volume 2, Issue 227
Jamestown Foundation, Washington, D.C., Wed, Dec 7, 2005
 
23INTERVIEW WITH ZBIGNIEW BRZEZINSKI: “EUROPE FROM
                       CARBO DA ROCA TO KAMCHATKA”
INTERVIEW: with Zbigniew Brzezinski
By Yulia Mostovaya, Zerkalo Nedeli, Mirror-Weekly
International Social Political Weekly, No. 47 (575)
Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, 3-9 December, 2005
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1
COALITION TO GRADUATE UKRAINE FROM JACKSON-VANIK
                             NOW EXCEEDS 160 MEMBERS
                   Join the Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition now
                 U.S. House urged to take immediate legislative action

Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition

Steven Pifer & William Miller, Co-chair
Washington, D.C., Thursday, December 8, 2005

WASHINGTON – The Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition has now

grown to over 160 U.S. and international organizations, businesses and
interest groups!

The Coalition, which was launched in October, supports Ukraine’s

graduation from the provisions of the Jackson-Vanik Amendment.  The
Amendment, passed in 1974, imposed trade restrictions on the Soviet
Union (and its successors) in response to poor human rights practices,
particularly restrictions on the emigration of religious minorities.

Ukraine is a success story for Jackson-Vanik; the country has built a

strong record of open emigration and created conditions for religious
minorities to practice their beliefs freely.  Ukraine’s record has been
recognized by both Presidents Clinton and Bush.

The U.S. Senate passed Senate bill S. 632 on November 18 to graduate

Ukraine from Jackson-Vanik.  The Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition
now urges that the House of Representatives take similar action. 
Ukraine’s record merits graduation, which would be an important signal
of U.S. support for a democratic Ukraine.
 
         TO JOIN THE COALITION AND SUPPORT UKRAINE

To join the Coalition and support Ukraine’s graduation from Jackson-

Vanik,, email JVGC@usukraine.org or call 202 347 4264. For more
information on the Coalitions efforts and the history of the Jackson-Vanik
Amendment visit the Coalition’s website at
———————————————————————————————
                                  A CALL TO ACTION
       Graduating Ukraine from the Jackson-Vanik Amendment this year
                US House of Rep in session for only two more weeks

Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition
Washington, D.C. Wednesday, November 30, 2005

WASHINGTON – The Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition, with over 70
member organizations and businesses [now 160], needs your support to

encourage the U.S. Congress to pass legislation to graduate Ukraine from
the Jackson-Vanik Amendment this year.

The Amendment was passed in 1974 to impose trade restrictions on the
Soviet Union in response to its poor human rights policies, particularly its
restrictions on the emigration of religious minorities.

Ukraine is a success story for Jackson-Vanik, now having a strong record
of open emigration and having created conditions for religious minorities to
practice their beliefs freely.

Recognizing Ukraine’s full compliance with the Amendment, the U.S. Senate
acted to graduate Ukraine from the trade restriction on November 18, 2005 by
passing Senate bill S. 632.  Now the House of Representatives must also pass
legislation to graduate Ukraine from the Jackson-Vanik Amendment.

The House Ways and Means Committee is currently considering several
possible bills. However, the House of Representatives will be in session
for only two weeks, beginning on December 5, before recessing for the
holidays.

The Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition Co-Chairmen sent a letter on
November 30 to House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Bill Thomas
and Ranking Minority Member Charles B. Rangel urging their action to pass
legislation to graduate Ukraine (see text below).  The Coalition urges that
you immediately call or send a letter of support for Ukraine’s graduation as
well.

Due to increased security measures in Congress, correspondence through the
postal service can be delayed for up to two weeks. We therefore recommend
that you call or send letters via fax.

You can find a list of suggested points to address in your letter of support
on the US-Ukraine Foundation Website, http://www.usukraine.org by clicking

on the link for the “Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition Information Page.”

Please email JVGC@usukraine.org for more information or to add your
organization or business to the Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition.

———————————————————————————————–
                   WHO TO CONTACT IN US CONGRESS

    Graduating Ukraine from the Jackson-Vanik Amendment this year
           US House of Rep in session for only two more weeks

Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition
Washington, D.C. Wednesday, November 30, 2005

Please direct your calls/letters to: House Ways and Means Committee

Chairman Bill Thomas, R-CA
Phone (202) 225-2915, Fax (202) 225-8798
Attention: International Trade Aid, Mike Holland

Ranking Minority Member Charles B. Rangel, D-NY
Phone (202) 225-4365, Fax (202) 225-0816
Attention: International Trade Aid, Jon Sheiner

If your Congressman is a member of the House Ways and Means
Committee, please contact him/her with your support for Ukraine’s
graduation as well.  -30-
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[return to index] [The Action Ukraine Report (AUR) Monitoring Service]
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2. JACKSON-VANIK GRADUATION COALITION MEMBERSHIP LIST
                       Over 160 Members as of December 7, 2005
 
Jackson-Vanik Graduation Coalition

Steven Pifer & William Miller, Co-chair
Washington, D.C., Thursday, December 8, 2005
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. – The membership list of the Jackson-Vanik
Graduation Coalition topped 160 members on Wednesday, December
7, 2005.  Companies and organizations can still join the Coalition and
support Ukraine’s graduation from Jackson-Vanik. 
 
To join the Coalition email JVGC@usukraine.org or call 202-347-4264
in Washington, D.C. For more information on the Coalitions efforts
and the history of the Jackson-Vanik Amendment visit the Coalition’s
website at http://www.usukraine.org/jvgc.shtml.

JACKSON-VANIK GRADUATION COALITION MEMBERSHIP LIST
                       Over 160 Members as of December 7, 2005

Affiliated Appraisers
American Chamber of Commerce in Ukraine
American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Congress
American Ukrainian Medical Foundation
Arbor View Dental Clinic , Mt. Prospect , IL
Aspect Energy, LLC
Association for the Democratization of Ukraine
Association of American Youth of Ukrainian Descent- ODUM
Atlantic Group, Ltd.
A W and Sons Inc
Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz
Berdyansk Reapers
B’nai B’rith International
Bolshoi Agrotechnica Machina (BAM) America
BRAMA, Inc.
Breakthrough to People Network, Inc.
Breese Ventures
Buckner Orphan Care International
Cape Point Capital Inc.
Case New Holland, Inc.
Cardinal Resources PLC
Cargill Inc.
Chadbourne & Parke, LLC
Conlan & Associates
Council of Ukrainian-American Organizations of Greater Hartford
Customs, Trade & Risk Management Services, Ltd.
David D. Sweere & Sons International, Ltd.
Draper Fisher Jurvetson NEXUS
ECdata, Inc.
Excelsio Communications
Exquisite Elixirs, Inc.
Floral Designs by Katya, Chicago
Gold Coast Construction
Gold Coast Properties, Inc.
Gordon C. James Public Relations
Heller & Rosenblatt Law Firm
Hollywood Trident Foundation
Independent Voters for Equal Education & Opportunity
International Republican Institute
International Ukrainian Genocide-Holodomor Committee
Irondequoit-Poltava Sister Cities Committee
ISTIL (Ukraine)
ISTIL Group Inc.
Ivan Bahrianyj Foundation, Arlington  Heights, IL
John A. Wood, Associates Inc.
John Wood Ministries, Inc.
John Deere
Kalik Lewin Law Firm
Kiev-Atlantic Ukraine
Kobzar Society, Ltd.
Krislaty Realty Investments
Larry M. Walker Ministries, Inc.
Lemberg Unternehmensberatung, GmbH
MACOIL & Gas International
Maple Investments
Media Finance Management, LLC
Medical Relief Charity Fund
Melitopol Tractor Hydro Units Plant
Meta
Ministering to Ministers Foundation, Inc.
Moye Handling Systems, Inc.
NAS Global Trade Ltd.
National Conference on Soviet Jewry
Nealon and Associates, P.C.
New Millennium Strategies
New Roots Restoration
Organization for the Rebirth of Ukraine
Paco Links International
Parents Targeting Opportunity
Parents Targeting Achievement
Poltava Confectionery
RUKH- Ukrainian Movement to aid Democracy in Ukraine, Chicago
Russian-Ukrainian Legal Group, P.A.
Salans Law Firm
Sevastopol Shipyard
Shevchenko Scientific Society
SigmaBleyzer Emerging Markets Private Equity Investment Group
Siguler Guff & Company, LLC
Skarabey Group LLC
Society for Fostering Jewish Ukrainian Relations
Softline
Solid Team, LLC
St. Andrew Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Bloomingdale, IL
St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral – B.M.V. Sodality, Chicago
“St. Sophia” Religious Association of Ukrainian Catholics, Inc. USA
Sweet Analysis Services, Inc.
Techinvest
TEREX Corporation
The Action Ukraine Report (AUR)
The Bleyzer Foundation
The International Medical Education Foundation, Inc.
The Washington Group
Ukraine-United States Business Council
Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the USA
Ukrainian American Civil Liberties Association
Ukrainian American Coordinating Council
Ukrainian-American Environmental Association
Ukrainian American Senior Citizens Association
Ukrainian American Sports Center “Tryzub”
Ukrainian Association in Austria
Ukrainian Community Action Network, Chicago
Ukrainian Cossack Brotherhood, Chicago
Ukrainian Credit Union Development Committee
Ukrainian Cultural Center, Fairfax, VA
Ukrainian Cultural & Humanitarian Institute
Ukrainian Education & Cultural Center
Ukrainian Engineer’s Society of America, Inc. Philadelphia Chapter
Ukrainian Federal Credit Union
Ukrainian Federation of America
Ukrainian Fraternal Organization
Ukrainian Genocide Famine Foundation, Chicago
Ukrainian Gold Cross, Inc.
Ukrainian Holodomor Exhibition Committee
Ukrainian Human Rights Committee
Ukrainian Institute of America
Ukrainian Medical Association of North America
Ukrainian National Credit Union Association
Ukrainian National Association
Ukrainian National Museum of Chicago
Ukrainian National Women’s League of America, Inc.
Ukrainian National Women’s League of America, Regional Councils:
Detroit, New York, Central New York, Northern New York, Ohio,
New Jersey, Chicago, New England, Philadelphia; Branches at Large:
Phoenix, Atlanta, Miami, Pittsburgh, Denver, North Port, Washington
D.C., San Jose, Los Angeles, Houston, Tucson, St. Petersburg
Ukrainian Selfreliance New England Federal Credit Union
Ukrainian Wave  Radio Program, Chicago
United Software Corporation
United Ukrainian American Organizations of Greater New York
United Ukrainian Organizations of Greater Cleveland (UZO)
U.S.- Ukraine Foundation
Vantage Enterprises, L.L.C.
Venable LLP
VIKO Corporation
Volia Cable
Volia Software, Inc.
Westinghouse
Wilton S. Tifft Photography
WJ Group of Agricultural Companies
WJ Hopper & Co., Limited
World Federation of Ukrainian Women’s Organizations, Financial Committee
World Federation of Ukrainian Medical Associations
www.ArtUkraine.com Information Service (ARTUIS)
Zaporizhya Meat Processing  
 
 JOIN THE JACKSON-VANIK GRADUATION COALITION NOW!
 
Your organization or business can still join the Jackson-Vanik Graduation
Coalition by sending an email to JVGC@usukraine.org or by calling
202-347-4264 in Washington, D.C. -30-
——————————————————————————————–
FOOTNOTE: We are working as a member of the Jackson-Vanik
Graduation Coalition to assist them in having over 200 members by
tomorrow, Friday, December 9. We urge your company or organization
to sign up immediately. Your support is needed now! Please contact me
if you have any questions or want to become a member, e-mail
mwilliams@SigmaBleyzer.com.  Morgan Williams, EDITOR
———————————————————————————————
[return to index] [The Action Ukraine Report (AUR) Monitoring Service]
========================================================
      Send in names and e-mail addresses for the AUR distribution list.
========================================================
3. SEC OF STATE RICE WRITES CONG CHARLES RANGEL THAT
        ADMINISTRATION SUPPORTS UKRAINE’S GRADUATION
                       FROM JACKSON-VANIK AMENDMENT

Office of the Secretary of State
U.S. Department of State
Washington, D.C., November 8, 2005

THE SECRETARY OF STATE
WASHINGTON

November 8, 2005

Dear Mr. Rangel:

The Administration strongly supports appropriate legislation that would
authorize the President to terminate the application of Title IV of the
Trade Act of 1974 (the Jackson-Vanik Amendment), with respect to Ukraine,
and to extend permanent normal trade relations treatment to products of that
country.

Since 1993, every administration has found Ukraine in compliance with the
freedom of emigration criteria on which the Jackson-Vanik Amendment is
based. The Bush Administration has consistently supported the termination

of Jackson-Vanik with respect to Ukraine.

 In view of the dramatic democratic transformation that Ukraine has
undergone in the past year and the efforts of the Yushchenko government to
complete Ukraine’s accession to the World Trade Organization and to
integrate more closely with trans-Atlantic institutions, it is important
that Congress act to lift Jackson-Vanik.

The success of Ukrainian democracy is vital not only for the people of
Ukraine, but also for the region as a whole. Congressional action to lift
Jackson-Vanik and extend permanent normal trade relations would send a
strong signal of support to Ukraine at a critical juncture.

This support is not intended to minimize the importance of outstanding trade
issues between our two countries. The State Department will continue to
support the work of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative to ensure
that Ukraine’s eventual entry into the WTO is consistent with WTO
requirements and benefits American businesses, farmers, and ranchers, and
promotes economic prosperity and rule of law in Ukraine.

Sincerely,

Condoleezza Rice

The Honorable Charles B. Rangel,
House of Representatives.
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[return to index] [The Action Ukraine Report (AUR) Monitoring Service]

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       Send in names and e-mail addresses for the AUR distribution list.
========================================================
4. U.S. STATE SEC RICE CALLS UKRAINE ‘STRATEGIC PARTNER’
        VOICES SUPPORT FOR UKRAINE’S REFORM PROGRAM

Mara D. Bellaby, AP Worldstream
Kiev, Ukraine, Wednesday, December 07, 2005

KIEV – U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice called Ukraine a “strategic
partner” on Wednesday and said the United States is committed to helping
this reform-minded ex-Soviet republic.

Rice’s brief visit to Ukraine provided a boost for President Viktor
Yushchenko, whose popularity has fallen amid disappointment that change is
coming too slowly to this nation of 47 million.

“We are certainly committed to Ukraine’s full integration to the
international economy and ultimately to Euro-Atlantic structures,” Rice said
at a joint news conference in Kiev with Yushchenko.

Yushchenko, who came to power after last year’s Orange Revolution mass
protests, has adopted a pro-western course, with the aim of winning
membership in the European Union and NATO.

He has pursued close relations with the United States, which denounced his
initial electoral defeat last year as fraudulent and joined calls for the
repeat vote that brought him to power.

While many Ukrainians credit Yushchenko with improving Ukraine’s
international image, the country remains mired in poverty and its economy
went through some traumatic jolts under the new government, with its
economic growth at one point turning negative. The GDP growth has since
recovered to about 4 percent.

Opinion polls suggest that Yushchenko’s party is poised to take a beating
from his Orange Revolution opponent, Viktor Yanukovych, in next March’s
parliamentary race. Yanukovych had been backed by the Kremlin in last year’s
election and adopted a more hostile approach to the West.

“America of course values the friendship of Ukraine as a … strategic
partner and an important country within Europe,” Rice said.
She added that the U.S. looked forward to working further “with this team
that is so committed to democracy, so committed to Ukraine’s future and most
especially so committed to a better and more prosperous future for Ukrainian
people.”

The one-on-one talks came after wider discussions, in which some of
Yushchenko’s most senior aides participated, a sign of the importance that
Ukraine places on relations with Washington.

“I feel very positive about the good dynamics of our relationship,”
Yushchenko said.

But the talks failed to yield firm movement on Ukraine’s two main aims:
winning recognition as a market economy from Washington and securing
Washington’s support to join the World Trade Organization.

“Today, I think the questions are more procedural than substantive,”
Yushchenko said, insisting he was still optimistic for a “positive reaction”
when the WTO meets in Hong Kong this month.

Experts have ruled out any chance of Ukraine’s getting WTO membership this
year. It still needs to press six laws through a reluctant parliament and
conclude bilateral talks with nine countries, including the United States
and Australia.

Asked if the United States was ready to give Ukraine market economy status,
Rice said only that “we are certainly hopeful that we can move market
economy status talks forward.” She noted, however, “good progress.”

Later, at a meeting with students at Ukraine’s most prestigious university,
Taras Shevchenko, Rice thanked Ukraine for its contribution to the U.S.-led
war in Iraq.

Yushchenko campaigned on promises to bring the troops home, and the last
remaining 876 soldiers will return by the end of the year. “Your
contribution of troops to Iraq made a vital difference, and we respect your
decision to bring them home” Rice said.  -30-
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[return to index] [The Action Ukraine Report (AUR) Monitoring Service]
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5.          RICE URGES UKRAINE TO PROMOTE DEMOCRACY

Saul Hudson, Reuters News Service
Kiev, Ukraine, Thursday, December 8, 2005

KIEV — U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice praised Ukraine’s leaders
yesterday, but urged more work to foster democracy after last year’s wave of
Orange Revolution rallies.

Ms. Rice, on her first visit to Ukraine as the top U.S. diplomat, met with
Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko in Kiev amid concerns that voters were
losing faith in the government because of rifts and slowing economic growth.

“We look forward to further work with a team that is so committed to
democracy, is so committed to Ukraine’s future and so committed — most
especially — to a better and more prosperous future for the Ukrainian
people,” Ms. Rice said at a news conference with Mr. Yushchenko.

Mr. Yushchenko won a re-run of last year’s presidential election ordered by
the Supreme Court after weeks of mass protests against poll fraud that
became known as the Orange Revolution.

But U.S. officials have expressed concern that voters’ euphoria after Mr.
Yushchenko’s rise to power might have evaporated after a falling out with
former prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko and accusations of high-level
corruption.

The stakes are high ahead of a parliamentary election in March. Viktor
Yanukovich, who Mr. Yushchenko faced down in last year’s presidential
campaign, is leading opinion polls.

Ms. Rice urged the students to vote in the election and accept the results,
but called for them to lobby to make sure Ukraine’s press was free.

“It really now is up to you. Ukraine has won its democracy the hard way — 
you won it in the streets,” she said.

Mr. Yushchenko has set improved relations with Europe and the United
States — including membership in the European Union and NATO — as his

main policy goals.   -30-
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[return to index] [The Action Ukraine Report (AUR) Monitoring Service]
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6.  RICE EXPRESSES CONCERN IN KIEV OVER RESTRICTIVE
                  DRAFT RUSSIAN LEGISLATION ON NGO’S

Mara D. Bellaby, AP Worldstream
Kiev, Ukraine, Wednesday, Dec 07, 2005

KIEV – U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on Wednesday expressed
concern over restrictive draft Russian legislation regulating
non-governmental organizations.

“We would certainly hope that the importance of non-governmental
organizations to a stable, democratic environment would be understood by

the Russian government,” Rice said at a joint news conference in Kiev with
Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko.

The bill on noncommercial organizations, which has been approved by the
Kremlin-controlled lower house of parliament in the first of three readings,
would require local branches of foreign NGOs to reregister as de-facto
Russian entities, subject to stricter financial and legal restrictions.

Critics say the bill is another step in the Kremlin’s effort to tighten
control over society following the abolition of popular elections for
governors in Russia’s far-flung regions, effective state takeover of
nationwide television and the emergence of a tame parliament packed with
compliant lawmakers.

Some groups, such as Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, have

said they may have to shut down their Russian operations if the bill becomes
law.

Rice said that the United States has expressed its concerns to all levels of
the Russian government. She said NGOs and their role in helping citizens
organize themselves better and push for policy changes “is the essence of
democracy.”

“We are making the case to the Russian government,” she said.

President Vladimir Putin on Monday gave his administration five days to
draft amendments to the bill, taking into account concerns of Russian NGOs
and advice from European Union experts. It was as yet unclear what changes
would be made, but Putin’s instructions indicated that the Kremlin might
soften its approach.

Boris Gryzlov, the speaker of the lower house, the State Duma, said Tuesday
the legislation would help track how foreign donations were being spent.

“We need to solve issues of control over such organizations and their
transparency,” Gryzlov said in televised remarks. “I’m concerned about money
coming from abroad. We need to make sure it is indeed spent on humanitarian
and charity purposes.”

Federation Council speaker Sergei Mironov said the bill reflected Russia’s
concern over “uncontrolled” foreign activities on its territory. “We mustn’t
allow others to run our own house,” he said, according to the ITAR-Tass news
agency.

There are some fears that foreign-funded NGOs played a key role in helping
citizens in Ukraine, Georgia and Kyrgyzstan organize mass protests, which
ushered opposition leaders into power. Some of the NGOs did receive funding
from the United States, although the U.S. has repeatedly denied allegations
that it helped bankroll last year’s Orange Revolution in Ukraine.

The issue has further strained Moscow’s relations with Washington. It comes
at a delicate time as Russia is about to take over the yearlong chairmanship
of the Group of Eight – originally a club of leading Western industrial
powers that admitted Russia in the 1990s – with some critics suggesting that
Moscow is not suited to such a role because of democratic backsliding.
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[return to index] [The Action Ukraine Report (AUR) Monitoring Service]
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7. US OFFICIAL MEETS FORMER PRIME MINISTER TYMOSHENKO

                         QUIZZED BY UKRAINIAN STUDENTS 
                         Invites Yulia Tymoshenko to the United States

TV 5 Kanal, Kiev, in Ukrainian 1500 gmt 7 Dec 05
BBC Monitoring Service, UK, in English, Wed, Dec 07, 2005

KIEV – [Presenter] [Ukrainian President] Viktor Yushchenko and US Secretary
of State Condoleezza Rice met in Kiev today. Rice arrived in Kiev as part of
her European tour. [Passage omitted: Rice praised Ukraine’s democratic
development and criticized Russia for attempts to restrict NGO activity.]

Rice gave a noncommittal answer when asked when the USA would switch from
compliments to action and grant Ukraine the status of a market economy.

[Rice, in English, overlaid with Ukrainian translation] We will work hard to
move forward on this issue very fast. Representatives of our trade ministry
will shortly be here to continue talks. As soon as Ukraine meets all the
requirements, we will grant Ukraine the status of a market economy. I hope
that this will happen shortly.

[Yushchenko] I would say that we are in a very positive regime. We have sent
the last technical explanations of the steps we are taking in various
economic sectors and we hope that the US side will be satisfied with these
technical positions.

[Passage omitted: Rice discussed political and economic cooperation with
Prime Minister Yuriy Yekhanurov earlier today.]

[Presenter] Immediately after her meeting with Yushchenko, Rice visited the
National Taras Shevchenko University.

In her introductory speech, she praised the initiators of the Orange
Revolution for the development of democracy. She also said that the USA
treats with understanding Ukraine’s wish to pull its peacekeeping contingent
out of Iraq.

Students managed to put 12 questions to Rice within the hour set. Girls
asked her about how the dark-skinned woman managed to reach a high post

of that kind, about her attitude to her nickname as a warrior princess, and
about how she is getting on with Bush. Boys showed more interest in
political issues.

They asked Rice whether she would run for president. The answer was no.
Asked whether the USA will help [Ukraine] join the WTO, the answer was yes.
Asked whether she thinks Ukrainian MPs need deputy immunity, she said she
does not know what this is.

Rice also met the leader of the Yuliya Tymoshenko Bloc [and former prime
minister], Yuliya Tymoshenko. During the meeting, they discussed possible
threats to democracy in the world. After that, Rice invited Tymoshenko to
visit the USA at her earliest convenience.  -30-
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8.   US SECRETARY OF STATE RICE SAYS THE PEOPLE WHO
          LAUNCHED THE ORANGE REVOLUTION NOW NEED
                     TO DELIVER ON THAT REVOLUTION

Anne Gearan, AP Online, Berlin, Germany, Wed, Dec 07, 2005

BERLIN – Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice delivered a subtle warning

to Ukraine’s struggling government ahead of a visit intended to bolster
President Viktor Yushchenko a year after he came to power in a popular
revolution.

Washington is still high on Yushchenko despite stumbles in office, but
Rice’s message was clear.

“The people who launched the Orange Revolution now need to deliver on

that revolution,” Rice said Tuesday in Berlin. Her five-day European tour
included Romania on Tuesday and NATO headquarters in Brussels later
this week.

Rice’s trip to the Ukraine capital could help her change the subject on a
trip so far dominated by allegations of secret CIA prisons in Europe and the
U.S. treatment of terror suspects in those facilities.

Rice was meeting Yushchenko and the country’s foreign minister Wednesday,
and taking questions from university students.

Her motorcade entered the Ukrainian capital along the route where
demonstrators set up a tent city last year and eventually helped force aside
a Russian-allied candidate. The protesters adopted the color orange, which
was Yushchenko’s party color.

The United States played an important role in condemning a fraud-marred
presidential vote and calling for a revote, which Ukraine’s Supreme Court
ordered and Yushchenko won.

Yushchenko was elected after surviving dioxin poisoning that disfigured his
face. He blames the poisoning on the regime of his predecessor, strongman
Leonid Kuchma, who had supported Yushchenko’s opponent in the election.

Yushchenko campaigned partly on a promise to pull Ukraine’s troops out of
the U.S.-led coalition in Iraq, but the Bush administration quickly adopted
him as a democratic darling. The Ukrainian leader visited the White House in
April.

Many Ukrainians now express disappointment at their nation’s failure to
improve living standards and battle corruption since the dramatic days of
the street protests.

There have been no demonstrable improvements in poverty rates, and
Yushchenko’s approval ratings have plunged.

As Ukraine celebrated the Orange anniversary last month, revolution leaders
were divided against each other in a welter of allegations of corruption and
influence-peddling involving some of Yushchenko’s closest aides.

Those who hoped for a clean break from Russia and acceptance in the West
feel let down, while in the Russian-speaking east of the country, many feel
their country has been hijacked.

Yushchenko’s party faces a tough challenge in March as Ukrainians elect a
new parliament.

On the bright side, the European Union agreed last week to declare Ukraine a
free market economy, handing Yushchenko a major victory as he seeks eventual
membership in the 25-nation bloc.

“The European Union has been very involved in the development of a plan

for action with Ukraine, as has the United States, and this is an area that
really does bear our attention,” Rice said in Berlin.

Market economy status should further open EU markets to Ukrainian exports.
EU officials also backed Ukraine’s ambitions to join the World Trade
Organization.  -30-
———————————————————————————————-

On the Net: CIA Factbook on Ukraine:
http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbo ok/geos/up.html
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9.          US STATE SECRETARY RICE PRAISES UKRAINE’S
                 DEMOCRACY, WARNS RUSSIA OVER NGO’S
               USA will grant Ukraine market economy status ‘soon.’
                         US representatives will visit Kiev soon

TV 5 Kanal, Kiev, in Ukrainian 1000 gmt 7 Dec 05
BBC Monitoring Service, UK, in English, Wed, Dec 07, 2005

KIEV – US State Secretary Condoleezza Rice has said that the USA will

grant Ukraine market economy status “soon”. Ukrainian President Viktor
Yushchenko said that market economy status for Ukraine is only a technical
issue now.
Rice praised Ukraine’s democratic development and criticized Russia for
attempts to restrict NGO activity.

The following is the text of a report by Ukrainian television TV 5 Kanal on
7 December:

[Presenter] Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko and US State Secretary
Condoleezza Rice have ended their talks. Yushchenko emphasized at the talks
the importance of granting Ukraine market economy status by the USA and of
Ukraine’s entry into the World Trade Organization. Correspondent Olha
Koshelenko has the details. So, Olha, when can Ukraine expect the desired
status from the USA?

[Correspondent] Good afternoon, Pavlo. Condoleezza Rice and Viktor
Yushchenko discussed granting Ukraine the status of a market economy by the
USA. Viktor Yushchenko said that this is more a technical issue now because
all the explanations have been given to the USA and now Ukraine is expecting
a positive answer.

Rice said that the US Department of Commerce has its own procedure. The
documents are being studied now and US representatives will visit Kiev soon
to hold additional talks here. As soon as they finish Ukraine will be
granted this status immediately. Asked when exactly, Rice said, soon.

[Presenter] Olha, how did Condoleezza Rice assess the level of democratic
development in Ukraine?

[Correspondent] Condoleezza Rice recalled that she visited Ukraine in 2002
and that she had noticed many changes since then, both in political and
economic spheres. She described Ukraine as a big strategic partner of the
USA. She is pleased to work with a team devoted to the principles of
democracy, she said.

However, Rice criticized Russian democracy. I recall that the Russian State
Duma has approved in the first reading a law restricting the activities of
NGOs. Ukraine has very strong civil society, but Russia is now trying to
restrict its civil society, she said.

The USA has already signalled Russia at all levels that NGO activity is
important and expressed concern about the situation in Russia, she said.

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10.    UKRAINE EXPECTS “POSITIVE SIGNALS” AT HONG KONG
              WTO MEETING PRESIDENT YUSHCHENKO STATED

Interfax-Ukraine news agency, Kiev, in Russian 1004 gmt 7 Dec 05
BBC Monitoring Service, UK, in English, Wed, Dec 07, 2005

KIEV – Ukraine expects a positive statement from the WTO summit in Hong

Kong regarding its membership, Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko said
at a joint briefing with US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in Kiev today.
[Passage omitted: repetition.]

“Ukraine should take some time, at least until the parliamentary election
[in March] in order to answer all the questions concerning WTO accession
that are remaining unanswered today,” he said.

He added that “technical issues” are left to discuss, and that Ukraine still
needs to sign the protocols of mutual access to the markets of goods and
services with eight or nine countries, including the USA and Australia.

He said that Ukraine now has “85 per cent of the tariff regime required by
the WTO”. “As for other positions, we have done calculations and we

believe that during a transition period following Ukraine’s accession to the
WTO we could undertake some commitments and ensure their fulfilment,”
he said.

[Yushchenko had previously said that Ukraine would aim for WTO

accession before the end of 2005]  -30-
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11.   UKRAINE FORMALLY JOINS SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE
                         DEFENSE MINISTERIAL (SEDM)

UPI, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, December 6, 2005

WASHINGTON – Ukraine formally joined the Southeastern Europe

Defense Ministerial Tuesday at a brief ceremony in Washington.

“You will see Ukraine more responsible and more engaged in dealing with
regional security institutions,” said Ukraine Defense Minister Anatoliy
Hrytsenko.

The annual meeting comes amid news reports that the United States is
maintaining secret prisons for accused terrorists in several countries, a
list that includes Romania, one of the SEDM members.

“The breadth of our agenda at this meeting is an indication of the
increasingly prominent role being played by each of your countries in issues
such as Kosovo, border security, counter-proliferation (and) the deployment
of the Southeastern European Defense Brigade,” said U.S. Defense Secretary
Donald Rumsfeld. “The importance of this cooperation is clear as new threats
emerge against the aspirations and the security of free peoples — these
threats we’ve seen in Bali, in Beslan, in Madrid, in London, and in our
countries.

The organization of 13 southeastern European countries and the United States
was formed in 1996 against the backdrop of the Balkan conflict.

SEDM includes defense officials from Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece,
Italy, Macedonia, Slovenia, Turkey, Ukraine, Bosnia Herzegovina, Moldova,
Serbia Montenegro and the United States. The organization also sponsors a
joint defense brigade expressly for peacekeeping or humanitarian operations,
but not war or peace enforcement.  -30-
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12. UKRAINE’S DEFENCE MINISTER MEETS US COUNTERPART
                     DONALD RUMSFELD IN WASHINGTON

Interfax-Ukraine news agency, Kiev, in Russian 1121 gmt 7 Dec 05
BBC Monitoring Service, UK, in English, Wed, Dec 07, 2005

KIEV – Ukrainian Defence Minister Anatoliy Hrytsenko and his US colleague
Donald Rumsfeld have discussed the pullout of the Ukrainian peacekeeping
forces from Iraq.

The meeting was held within the framework of the conference of the
Southeastern European Defence Ministerial in Washington, the Ukrainian
Defence Ministry’s press service said.

The gradual withdrawal of troops was approved with the coalition and Iraqi
partners, Hrytsenko said. He added that about 50 peacekeepers will remain in
Iraq, as well as some military equipment that will be handed over to Iraq.

Hrytsenko thanked the USA for training Ukrainian officers in US military
colleges.

In Washington he also met Bulgarian Defence Minister Veselin Bliznakov.

They discussed regional security, analysed the current stage of military
cooperation and exchanged their ideas on the reform of national armed
forces.

As a result of the talks, Hrytsenko and Bliznakov signed a cooperation
agreement between the defence ministries of Ukraine and Bulgaria. The

sides also signed the plan of bilateral military cooperation for 2006.

As reported earlier, Ukraine became member of the Southeastern European
Defence Ministerial during its tenth annual conference.  -30-
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13. CANADIAN COMPANIES TO REAP NEW OPPORTUNITIES IN
  UKRAINE THROUGH NEW EDC-UKREXIMBANK LINE OF CREDIT

Maple Leaf News, E-ZINE, Vol. 60
Canadian Embassy in Ukraine
Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, December 7, 2005

KYIV – Export Development Canada (EDC) yesterday signed a USD 15 million
Line of Credit with the State Export Import Bank of Ukraine (UkrEximbank) to
facilitate the procurement of Canadian goods and services in an East
European market of growing importance to Canadian exporters and investors.

“With their strong economic growth in recent years, Ukraine has become an
increasingly important market to Canadians interested in Central and Eastern
Europe.” noted Benoit Daignault, EDC Senior Vice-President for Business
Development.

“Our enhanced relationship with UkrEximbank will help us promote Canadian
export activity in Ukraine, especially in key strategic sectors such as
agricultural equipment, packaging and food processing.

“EDC’s relationship with UkrEximbank stretches back to 1992, when this
institution began acting as borrowing agent for the Government of Ukraine
and today, this bank is one of our key partners in the market,” added Mr.
Daignault.

“While we worked with UkrEximbank in the early 90’s in their capacity as
agent for the Ukrainian government, EDC more recently concluded two
important transactions with the bank acting in its commercial capacity:
financings for agricultural equipment and a grain port storage facility. Our
positive experience in both cases encouraged us to expand our relationship
via this line of credit.”

UkrEximbank was founded in 1992 and was the sixth largest Ukrainian bank
by assets at end-2004, with a network of over 80 branches and outlets across
Ukraine. In addition to its commercial banking activities, UkrEximbank is
the only Ukrainian bank that acts as a financial agent of the Ukrainian
government in attracting and servicing international loans to Ukrainian
corporates, which are extended under state guarantee.

Export Development Canada (EDC) is Canada’s export credit agency, offering
innovative commercial solutions to help Canadian exporters and investors
expand their international business. EDC’s knowledge and partnerships are
used by 7000 Canadian companies and their global customers in up to 200
markets worldwide each year.

EDC is financially self-sustaining and is a recognized leader in financial
reporting, economic analysis and human resource management.  -30-
————————————————————————————————-
Media contact: Phil Taylor, EDC Public Affairs
(613) 598-2904, ptaylor@edc.ca, www.kyiv.gc.ca
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14. FOREIGN BANKS TO LEND MTS’ UKRAINE MOBILE TELEPHONE
             UNIT UMC $150 MILLION TO EXPAND ITS NETWORK

Dow Jones Newswires, Moscow Bureau
Moscow, Russia, Thursday, December 8, 2005 

MOSCOW — UMC, a Ukrainian unit of Russia’s OAO Mobile TeleSystems

(MBT), will borrow $150 million from a syndicate of foreign banks, Russian
telecommunication research agency Comnews reported Thursday.

ING Groep N.V. (30360.AE) and Citigroup (C) will organize this one-year
loan, guaranteed by the parent company.

UMC plans to use the proceeds to expand its network, which is important as
the market gets saturated and competition is getting tougher. In November,
UMC has lost leadership per user to Kyivstar. [Agency Web site:
http://www.comnews.ru]  -30-
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15.    NEW AES INVESTMENT IN BULGARIAN POWER PLANT
In Bid to Boost Revenue, U.S. Company Makes Bet On Southeastern Europe

        [AES has major investments in two Ukrainian power companies]

By Cristi Cretzan, Dow Jones Newswires
The Wall Street Journal, New York, NY,
Wednesday, December 7, 2005; Page B11

SOFIA, Bulgaria — AES Corp. is plugging into southeastern Europe’s
energy market with a Euro 1.1 billion ($1.3 billion) power-plant project in
Bulgaria, betting on the region’s economic growth to boost its European
revenue.

The power-plant project is the start of a new series of AES investments in
Europe’s emerging economies, Chief Executive Paul Hanrahan said in an
interview this week.

AES, which expects to sign a financing plan on the project in Sofia, the
capital of Bulgaria, today, will bid for Romania’s state-owned power
suppliers and generators, as well as consider acquisitions in Poland and
scour Turkey for investment opportunities, Mr. Hanrahan added.

Southeastern Europe’s electricity market is becoming increasingly attractive
for major utility companies. Countries such as Bulgaria and Romania, which
hope to join the European Union in 2007, have enjoyed annual economic
growth rates of at least 4% for the past four years, nearly double the
average growth in EU countries. The region needs about Euro 15 billion

to upgrade its existing power plants or build new ones, according to a
World Bank study released in July.

AES is involved in the privatization of Romanian electricity distributor
Muntenia Sud, which has attracted nonbinding bids from 10 utilities
including AES, Germany’s E.On AG, Italy’s Enel SpA, Spain’s Iberdrola SA
and Gaz de France. Final bids are expected in January, and the government
will select a winner in the first quarter of 2006.

AES, a global company with utilities and power plants in 27 countries, often
has been willing to invest in nations that other U.S. power companies
overlooked and has a reputation for granting lots of autonomy to local
employees. But since 2002, it has sought to centralize more operations and
establish stricter controls and oversight at its Arlington, Va.,
headquarters.

AES logged 2004 revenue of approximately $9.5 billion but has been late
releasing earnings this year. It said in July it would restate its financial
statements for 2002, 2003, 2004 and the first quarter of 2005 because of
problems with its deferred-tax accounting, which it is attempting to
correct. It hasn’t released second quarter or third quarter 2005 results.

Its Central and Eastern European investments, which include power plants in
Hungary, the Czech Republic and Ukraine, provided 58% of the $692 million
the company earned in fiscal 2004 from Europe. The company estimates that
the new Bulgarian plant will bring in $300 million in annual revenue
starting with 2010.

AES’s project consists of building a 670-megawatt power plant at the Maritsa
East coal-mining and power complex in central Bulgaria, 105 miles southeast
of Sofia. About Euro 790 million of the Euro 1.1 billion investment will be
financed through debt, with further funding provided by a consortium of
France’s Calyon PB Private, a unit of Crédit Agricole SA, as well as
France’s BNP Paribas, Dutch bank ING Groep NV and the European Bank
for Reconstruction and Development.

AES has subcontracted French engineering company Alstom SA on the
project, which is scheduled to start commercial operations in 2009 and will
replace some of Bulgaria’s current nuclear capacity — part of a pledge to
the EU to close two outdated reactors at its Kozloduy plant by 2007.

“It’s a project that makes sense for the country, and for us it’s a way to
gain access into the regional market,” Mr. Hanrahan said.

Attracting funding for such projects can be difficult, as continuous changes
in laws and regulations in emerging countries complicate long-term business
plans.

To be able to go ahead with the Bulgarian project, AES has signed a 15-
year deal with the state-run grid operator to sell its electricity at fixed
prices. It also sealed a 15-year deal with the government to buy Bulgarian
coal.

But long-term agreements with one power producer also can conflict with
EU rules restricting state aid to companies if the aid inhibits competition.
The European Commission, the EU’s executive body, last month started a
state-aid investigation into Hungary’s long-term power-purchase agreements
between state-owned power-network operators and foreign-owned power
generators.

In Bulgaria, Mr. Hanrahan said, the power-purchasing contract “isn’t
likely to be determined as being state aid,” because the electricity- and
coal-purchasing deals represent a trade-off that is “beneficial for the
country.”   -30-
———————————————————————————————-
Rebecca Smith in Los Angeles contributed to this article. Write to Cristi
Cretzan at cristi.cretzan@dowjones.com
———————————————————————————————
FOOTNOTE: AES is a major investor in two power plants in Ukraine.

AES is a member of the Ukraine-U.S. Business Council in Washington.
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          Power Corrupts and Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely.
========================================================
16.                              WHAT’S IN A NAME?

COMMENT & ANALYSIS: Observer
Financial Times, London, UK, Wed, December 7 2005

When things get tricky, Viktor Yushchenko, Ukraine’s president, can
always rely on his brother.

Back when Viktor was in opposition, his businessman brother Petro
sometimes kicked in with much-needed cash.

Now the president needs a more supportive parliament to push through
reforms. So his Our Ukraine party voted on Saturday to put the popular
president at the top of its ticket for elections in March, even though he
clearly isn’t planning to give up the presidency for a seat in parliament.

He yesterday rejected the idea, which then meant his six-party coalition,
the Our Ukraine Yushchenko Bloc, fell foul of a law that bans using the
names of people who are not candidates.

Step forward Petro Yushchenko again to put his name on the ballot –
and the party.   -30-
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17. THE PRESIDENT, THE LITTLE GIRL & SHRINERS HOSPITALS
        Nastya is already a hero in her homeland, Ukraine’s Kharkiv region

Rushville Republican, Rushville, Indiana, Tuesday, December 06, 2005

(NAPSA) – At six years old, Nastya is already a hero in her homeland, the
Ukraine’s Kharkiv region, where she risked her own life for her younger
sister.

In March 2005, Nastya was home alone with her two-year-old sister, Lyuda,
when a fire erupted. The quick-thinking girl plucked her little sister from
the flames and carried her to safety. Lyuda had minor injuries. Nastya,
however, sustained third-degree burns over nearly 90 percent of her body.

Word reached the Ukraine’s newly installed president, Viktor Yushchenko,
who – himself left disfigured and in pain after an assassination attempt –
offered his support to the little girl.

President Yushchenko sought the best treatment available in the Ukraine for
Nastya, but the small country’s facilities could not offer the advanced
treatment she so desperately needed. It was then that a charitable
organization in that country – familiar with the work of Shriners Hospitals
for Children-recommended Nastya be treated at Shriners Burns
Hospital-Boston.

“When Nastya came to us, she was very sick,” Robert Sheridan, M.D.,
Assistant Chief of Staff at Shriners Burns Hospital-Boston, recalled. “She
had very deep burns and infections, and was on and off of the breathing
machine.”

At the hospital, Nastya received numerous procedures at no expense to her
family, or any third party. President Yushchenko tracked her progress, even
visiting her bedside while on a trip to the states to receive the John F.
Kennedy Profile in Courage Award.

President Yushchenko told reporters that he is grateful to Shriners
Hospitals for making it possible for Nastya to be brought to Boston for
treatment.

After several months of treatment, Dr. Sheridan determined that Nastya was
well enough to return home. Nastya recently attended her first day of school
in the Ukraine-accompanied by First Lady Kateryna Yushchenko, who
vowed to support the girl’s family and to found burn centers there modeled
after Shriners Hospitals.

For more information on Shriners’ network of 22 hospitals that provide
medical care and services totally free of charge to children with
orthopaedic problems, burns and spinal cord injuries, write to Shriners
International Headquarters, Public Relations Dept., 2900 Rocky Point Dr.,
Tampa, FL 33607 or visit the Web site at www.shrinershq.org.

Treatment is provided to children under age 18 without regard to race,
religion or relationship to a Shriner. If you know a child that Shriners can
help, call 1-800-237-5055 in the United States or 1-800-361-7256 in Canada.
————————————————————————————————
http://www.rushvillerepublican.com/features/local_story_340222533.html
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18.   ADOPTED CHILDREN FROM UKRAINE MAKE COUPLE’S

                    HOUSE A HOME IN SOUTH CAROLINA

By Toya Graham, The Associated Press
The Sun News, Myrtle Beach Online
Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Wed, December 7, 2005

ROCK HILL – This holiday season will be extra special for Gina and Donnie
Chapman. The Rock Hill couple recently returned from Ukraine with two new
family members, Yuri, 12, and Tolli, 6.

“We didn’t realize how great having children would be,” Gina Chapman, 33,
said as she looked across the room at her new sons, who are brothers. “We
didn’t have a clue. We knew something was missing, and it was them.”

Some Americans choose to cross the Atlantic Ocean to adopt children. It’s a
trend that’s on the rise, said Sharon Cole, director of Christian Family
Services, a Fort Mill nonprofit adoption agency.

“There are fewer babies in the United States,” Cole said. “Less and less
women are choosing adoption as a resolution for unplanned pregnancies.”

Gina and Donnie Chapman made the decision to adopt a boy in 2002. They
could have children of their own but wanted to adopt.

“There’s just so many children out there who need parents,” said Gina
Chapman, who sells real estate.

The next year, the couple started the tedious adoption process, which lasted
nearly two years. They looked into domestic adoption as well as foster
adoption.

“We didn’t want to fall in love with foster children and have them taken
away from us,” said Donnie Chapman, 41, a lab technician with an N.C. firm.

So, the couple looked overseas. After obtaining adoption approval from the
United States, they traveled to Ukraine in late September to pick out their
children. During their six-week stay, the Chapmans spent three hours daily
at the orphanage, where they played with all the children.

Tolli proved tough to win over. “Tolli ran from us at the orphanage,” Gina
Chapman said. “He didn’t like us until we actually took him out of the
orphanage.” The couple got final approval from the Ukraine officials on Oct.
21.

“Now, we’re thrown into instant parenthood,” Gina Chapman said as she
watched the boys dart across the room.

The boys speak mostly Russian words — Gina and Donnie know about
400 words in Russian. Other communication comes through gestures
and symbols.

Although life is a little chaotic now, Donnie Chapman wouldn’t have it any
other way. “I love it,” he said with a chuckle. “I’m just so happy. I’ve
always wanted to be a father.”

The Chapmans’ adoptions were prompted by the success David and Kim
Lee of Rock Hill had when they adopted internationally. The Chapmans
and Lees are good friends and work together. The Lees expanded their
family when they adopted Mattie, 4, and Lidia, 2, from Russia.

When Kim Lee married David 11 years ago, she became stepmother to his
children, Amber, 22, and Spencer, 13. The Lees wanted their own children,
but they weren’t able to have babies. “I just accepted that I would never
have kids,” said 48-year old Kim Lee. Then she had a dream.

“An angel came to me in a dream and said, ‘Your babies are in Russia,'” said
Lee, who completed a ton of paperwork during a nine-month process before
leaving for Russia in November 2001 during the aftermath of the Sept. 11,
2001, terrorist attacks.

“It was a different world,” said David Lee, a Rock Hill contractor. “But Kim
wouldn’t be denied her baby.” They returned to the United States nearly two
weeks later with Mattie, then 8 months old.

The couple wanted a sister for Mattie to grow up with, so they went back to
Russia in February 2003 and adopted Lidia, then 11 months.

For Gina and Donnie Chapman, the honeymoon hasn’t worn off. “Adopting
Yuri and Tolli is the best thing we’ve ever done for each other,” Donnie
Chapman said.  -30-
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http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/news/local/13346859.htm
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19.  UKRAINE’S STAR STRIKER CHASING WORLD CUP DREAM
                    For Andriy Shevchenko the big one beckons

AP Worldstream, Kiev,Ukraine, Thu, Dec 08, 2005

KIEV – Andriy Shevchenko already has fulfilled many of his dreams and
promises. The big one beckons when he leads Ukraine at next year’s

World Cup.

Shevchenko, supported by Andriy Husin and Andriy Voronin, scored six

goals as Ukraine qualified for the finals of soccer’s showcase for first time.

“Sheva” – as fans of his Italian club, AC Milan, call him – said in a recent
interview he already had achieved some of his goals.

He promised his mentor, Valery Lobanosky, to become the first Ukrainian
player to win the Champions League title and he did it with AC Milan in
2003, converting the decisive penalty in a shootout with Italian rival
Juventus.

He dreamt of winning the Golden Ball award as Europe’s best soccer player
and took the prize last year. “Reaching the World Cup finals with Ukraine
was another of my dreams by now achieved. Next … comes a good showing

in the finals against the world soccer giants,” Shevchenko said.

Idolized at home, Shevchenko is feeding high hopes of Ukrainian soccer fans.
“We expect only victory, nothing else (in Germany),” said Yevheniy Bobok, a
27-year-old businessman who works in central Kiev. “Let Shevchenko score
many goals for his fatherland.”

Shevchenko has scored many goals indeed. He has 113 with AC Milan in Serie

A matches since joining the Milan powerhouse in 1999 on a A20.7 million
($24.31 million) move from Dynamo Kiev.

He scored 24 goals in his first season in Italy to become the Serie A top
striker. With Ukraine he has 21 goals and 38 caps.

Shevchenko is considered one of the best forwards on the European stage,
combining speed and power with great technique.
Yet the creed of the 29-year-old is teamwork.

“I’m the player finalizing the team efforts, but the teamwork is the key to
every success. When I score, it’s not my victory but the team victory,”
Shevchenko said after netting four goals in a crucial European Champions
League match against Fenerbahce last month.

He repeated the deeds of former AC Milan Dutch star Marco Van Basten – now
Netherlands coach – who tallied four in a Champions League match against IFK
Goteborg in 1992.

Like Van Basten, Sheva is a quick goal poacher inside the penalty area but
is also strong with headers and can score from the distance with both feet.
“What unites me and Van Basten is the ball rolling into the net,” he says.

A hardworking professional in training, Shevchenko also thinks of business
and his future. He has been modeling for Italian top fashion designer
Giorgio Armani and has opened an Armani shop in Kiev.

Soccer and business come after his family, however. “Soccer trophies don’t
change your life, but a son does,” he said at the baptism of his first son,
Jordan, last September. He’s married to an American model.  -30-

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20.        UKRAINE PRESIDENT CONDEMNS ANTI-SEMITISM

Press office of President Victor Yushchenko of Ukraine
Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, December 5, 2005

KYIV – Victor Yushchenko urged society to jointly condemn all
manifestations of anti-Semitism and xenophobia, and claimed that the
state would not tolerate them.

The President stressed that government should protect citizens of all
nationalities and religious beliefs. He pledged that it would consistently
fight against national, racial or religious discrimination in our country.

“There can be no national issue in a civilized country,” he said. The
Head of State is worried that anti-Semitism spreads throughout
Ukraine.

He condemned the Interregional Academy of Personnel Management
(IAPM) as an institution that systematically publishes anti-Semitic
articles in its publication ‘Personnel.’

Yushchenko said he had left the supervisory council of the journal to
protest against this inhumane policy. He called on professors of the
IAPM to respect citizens of all nationalities and confessions and to
“stop rousing national hatred.”  -30-
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LINK: http://www.president.gov.ua/en/news/data/1_4728.html
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21. UKRAINIAN JEWISH ACTIVIST ACCUSES GOVERNMENT OF
                DOING LITTLE TO COMBAT ANTI-SEMITISM

AP Worldstream, Kiev, Ukraine, Wednesday, Dec 07, 2005

KIEV – A Ukrainian Jewish activist on Wednesday accused the government

of doing too little to combat anti-Semitism and urged the country’s Jewish
groups to be more active.

“Manifestations of anti-Semitism worry the authorities no more than last
year’s snow,” said Oleksandr Nayman of a local Jewish group.

He warned that the number of anti-Semitic publications increased almost
twice in the past year, and claimed that the laws that regulate ethnic and
religious relations “exist only on paper.”

Nayman, however, also accused Jews themselves of passivity. “Such inertia

in Germany in the 20’s and 30’s led to the murder of millions of Jews later,”
he said.

Nazi troops killed tens of thousands of Ukrainian Jews over just a few days
in World War II – victims of the massacre are honored every year in Ukraine,
at the Babi Yar ravine.

This fall, a rabbi and his son were beaten in Kiev in an attack police
called hooliganism, dismissing the possibility that it was motivated by
anti-Semitism.

During the summer, skinheads in Kiev severely beat a Jewish student who was
taken, in a coma, to a Tel Aviv hospital for brain surgery. Police said that
attack was also hooliganism.

President Viktor Yushchenko has denied that anti-Semitism was a problem in
his ex-Soviet nation, but promised nevertheless to treat the issue with the
utmost seriousness.

Hundreds of thousands of Jews were killed in Ukraine over the centuries in
pogroms staged by nationalists, and millions died during the Holocaust.

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22. SECURITY GUARD MELNYCHENKO RETURNS TO UKRAINE
        Will Melnychenko tapes play a role in Ukrainian parliamentary race?

ANALYSIS & COMMENTARY: By Taras Kuzio
Eurasia Daily Monitor, Volume 2, Issue 227
Jamestown Foundation, Washington, D.C., Wed, Dec 7, 2005

Mykola Melnychenko, the presidential guard who was involved in bugging
President Leonid Kuchma’s office between 1998 and 2000, returned to Ukraine
on November 29. Exactly five years earlier Melnychenko fled Ukraine to
Poland and then Prague, where he lived until obtaining political asylum in
the United States in April 2001.

During Melnychenko’s absence his “recordings have remained a significant
factor in Ukrainian domestic politics” (Zerkalo tyzhnia, November
26-December 2). Why is he returning only now, when many Ukrainian
commentators expected Melnychenko to return immediately after the election
of President Viktor Yushchenko one year ago? There are two answers.

First, Prosecutor-General Sviatoslav Piskun was sacked in October. Piskun
had been reinstated on December 10, 2004, two days after the Ukrainian
parliament adopted the “compromise package” permitting a re-run of round two
of the disputed presidential election.

Piskun has been accused of blocking investigations of high-ranking officials
from the Kuchma regime for a number of crimes, including the murder of
Ukrayinska pravda editor Heorhiy Gongadze in 2000. The accusations seem
confirmed by Piskun’s appearance on the Regions of Ukraine list for the
March 2006 parliamentary elections, a party linked to the former regime.

The other factor is the upcoming parliamentary election. Melnychenko has
accused parliamentary speaker Volodymyr Lytvyn of complicity in the Gongadze
murder, charges that could dent his popularity with voters (Ukrayinska
pravda, December 6; Zerkalo tyzhnia, December 3-9).

Socialist Party of Ukraine leader Oleksandr Moroz first disclosed a fragment
of the Melnychenko tapes in the Ukrainian parliament on November 28, 2000.
The SPU would like Melnychenko in its parliamentary faction, but Ukrainian
courts had refused to permit the guard to run on the SPU ticket in the 2002
elections. While Ukrainian courts and the European Court of Human Rights
have subsequently demanded that Melnychenko be made a parliamentary deputy,
the Central Election Commission continues to ignore these rulings.

However, the CEC’s obstinacy will not necessarily apply to the SPU’s 2006
election list if Melnychenko opts to remain in Ukraine. If it wins 30 seats
as projected, the SPU could bring Melnychenko into parliament next year.

Melnychenko gave sworn testimony in the United States before he departed for
Ukraine (Ukrayinska pravda, November 29). In Ukraine he was summoned to the
Prosecutor’s Office, where he testified for another three hours. The
Prosecutor’s Office also received copies of Melnychenko’s tapes from the
Boris Berezovsky Foundation and former Security Service chairman Oleksandr
Turchynov.

Melnychenko’s latest statements also implicate Mykola Azarov, the former
head of the Tax Administration, the late interior minister Yuriy Kravchenko,
former SBU chairman Leonid Derkach, and former Kuchma adviser and energy
oligarch Oleksandr Volkov.

Accusations against the latter two could cause problems for Yushchenko and
former prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko. Derkach’s son, Andrei, heads the
media outlets Kievski Telegraf, Versi.com, and Era TV and Radio, which all
supported Yushchenko in the 2004 elections.

Volkov could be a complication for Tymoshenko. His high-profile presence in
the Tymoshenko bloc tarnishes her image as a populist, anti-oligarch
politician. It also raises questions about whether Tymoshenko could support
an investigation of Melnychenko’s accusations when they could affect one of
her key advisers.

Melnychenko’s return may not lead to charges against senior Kuchma
officials. In the past year, no high-ranking Kuchma official has been
charged with election fraud or abuse of office or corruption, let alone the
Gongadze affair. Now, all of the likely suspects appear prominently on the
Regions of Ukraine 2006 election list. If no charges are filed before the
2006 vote, they will be shielded by parliamentary immunity.

As for Kuchma himself, two factors make the Yushchenko administration
reluctant to accuse him of involvement in the Gongadze murder.

First, Yushchenko may have been pressured into giving some form of immunity
to Kuchma during the December 2004 round-table negotiations to stop the
Orange Revolution protests. Yushchenko is also reluctant to set a precedent
of filing criminal charges against former presidents, fearing he could be
next.

Second, Yushchenko and his entourage believe that Russia was in some way
behind the Melnychenko affair, particularly how Kuchma’s alleged order to
“rough” up Gongadze ended with murder. Some other force likely wanted Kuchma
implicated.

Four Interior Ministry policemen abducted Gongadze on September 16, 2000.
The leader of the group, General Oleksiy Pukach, is accused of actually
murdering Gongadze. After Gongadze was murdered his body was decapitated and
dumped in Moroz’s Kyiv oblast constituency, where it was quickly discovered.
Why would Kuchma want the body to be found, if he had indeed ordered the
killing?

The alleged Russian link comes via local Ukrainian politicians seeking to
weaken Kuchma, force him to resign early, and transfer power to a successor.
Russia’s likely partners would have been the Kyiv clan’s Social-Democratic
Party (United).

While living abroad, Melnychenko occasionally released selected fragments of
conversations, but never the full tapes. “Each time the release of the
recording was timed to a certain extent, it became clearer that Melnychenko
was not acting independently” (Zerkalo tyzhnia, November 26-December 2).

Few observers believe Melnychenko’s claim that he taped Kuchma’s office
single-handedly. The cloud of suspicion and other still-unanswered questions
have led to Melnychenko’s partial discrediting. Twelve presidential guards
who attended Melnychenko’s press conference insist that Melnychenko was

only given access to Kuchma’s office in the company of other officers, never
alone. They scoffed at his claim that he had placed a digital dictaphone
under Kuchma’s sofa (Inter TV, December 5).

Melnychenko’s tapes unleashed the Kuchmagate scandal, emboldened the
opposition, and compromised the Kuchma government. If the tapes were
intended to make Kuchma leave office early they failed; instead they led to
Yushchenko’s election and the Orange Revolution.  -30-
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LINK: http://www.jamestown.org
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23. INTERVIEW WITH ZBIGNIEW BRZEZINSKI: “EUROPE FROM
                       CARBO DA ROCA TO KAMCHATKA”

INTERVIEW: with Zbigniew Brzezinski
By Yulia Mostovaya, Zerkalo Nedeli, Mirror-Weekly
International Social Political Weekly, No. 47 (575)
Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, 3-9 December, 2005

I may be wrong, but my impression is that the only purpose that brought
Zbigniew Brzezinski, National Security Adviser to President Carter and
professor of political science, to Kyiv was to contribute to the
reconciliation between Yushchenko and Tymoshenko.

I do not think he is going to persuade, reproach, or frighten the two parts
of the orange team with a potential loss of power. He seems willing to
explain to them the historic importance of a democratic Ukraine’s success,
its geopolitical impact, and implications of its failure.

He could be planning to remind the divided Maidan leaders about their
responsibility, both to their country and to the civilization at large. What
arguments will the prominent political scientist be driving home?

The following is what Zbigniew Brzezinski said in his interview to ZN on
Friday morning. The ZN Editorial Board would like to thank the Center for
European and International Studies for arranging the interview.

[ZN] – Mr. Brzezinski, George Bush and Condoleezza Rice have repeatedly
stated their satisfaction with the expansion of the zone of democracy by
nations where democratic revolutions have been won. They have both spoken
of the “key role” that Ukraine has to play in the process. A year has
elapsed since Maidan. Do countries that have not yet undergone democratic
transformations view our country today as a positive or a discouraging
example?

[Brzezinski] – In general, it is a positive example. Only utopians could
have expected that everything would be perfect and a cardinal aim like this
could be achieved within a year. There is a perception that something
fundamental happened in Ukraine. It made clear its intention to be a
democratic and an independent state. I emphasize that it is both today.

Of course, Ukraine has not been too successful in combating corruption. Nor
has the country addressed all of its social issues. There is deep
disappointment inside Ukraine. To some extent, this disappointment can be
traced to the rip in the Yushchenko-Tymoshenko’s team. Besides, there seems
to be a lot of opportunism at the top.

However, the basic reality is that Ukraine is both independent and
democratic, which is decisive for the post-Soviet countries, in historical
terms. First of all, it is critical for Russia as Ukraine’s example is more
pertinent to it than the Polish one.

[ZN]- Yet democratic and undemocratic societies alike attach great
importance not only to the situation with human rights and freedom of
expression, but also to living standards and economic development. Ukraine
is now facing numerous internal economic challenges, and on top of it Russia
will probably send its gas prices soaring.

Why has the USA, recognizing Ukraine’s symbolic meaning and potential as a
success story, rendered practically no assistance to it over the year? There
have been neither substantial loans nor serious investments. Even the
Jackson-Vanick amendment has not been abrogated.

[Brzezinski] – In my opinion, the Jackson-Vanick amendment is a silly
rudiment of the Cold War. It survived due to the effort of some
veto-wielding congressmen. Yet one should not overestimate the impact of
this amendment.

Speaking of loans and investments, they will come once the country creates
favorable conditions. It takes years to ensure an enabling investment
climate. And nobody is going to do that for Ukraine. Poland got serious
investments, but it paved the way for them by becoming attractive for
foreign capitals. Ukrainian elite should realize this and work towards that
end.

[ZN]- Don’t you think the present Ukrainian political elite has had its day?
For the most part, it seems to have exhausted its potential. It is incapable
of communicating with the civilized world, generating “breakthrough” ideas,
and putting them into action.

The new generation has not emerged yet. The outdated elite, having stood its
ground at the 2004 presidential elections, will further enhance its power
after the 2006 parliamentary elections. Do you see a problem in Ukraine’s
having to live with this elite for another five years?

[Brzezinski] – Yes, I think this problem exists and, unfortunately, it makes
the difference between Ukraine and Poland more evident. Of course, Poland
got its independence much earlier than Ukraine. And people there have
idealized memories of the way in which this independence was gained.
Besides they had Solidarity, which established an alternative elite.

Yushchenko and, to a certain degree, Tymoshenko have not done enough to
mobilize the new, young elite and infuse its energy into the government and
public administration. The new elite is surfacing in Ukraine, but the state
leaders have not raised it to, say, an operational level.

Therefore, your main revolution is still ahead – it is a bloodless
revolution of the generation change. This is where Yushchenko and
Tymoshenko could have achieved more than they have to date.

A leader’s personality, temperament has a role to play, too. Yushchenko is a
democratic leader with a strong and holistic vision of democracy. Yet he is
also prone to compromises. From a democratic standpoint, compromises are
good but only in so far as they do not require people to sacrifice their
principles.

Tymoshenko is impulsive, bright, inspired. Only these two politicians’
concerted effort can provide conditions for an effective generation change.
Yushchenko is averse to rocking the boat, while Tymoshenko is not.

The key question is whether the Orange Revolution leaders can cooperate
productively. In my judgment, the Orange Revolution marked an awakening of
truly independent and democratic Ukrainians, not the former Soviet types but
young and new ones.

[ZN]- I agree. Nevertheless, there is very little hope that the Yushchenko
and Tymoshenko blocs will put many new names on their respective election
lists. The same applies to other blocs and parties, ranging from the
“Regions of Ukraine” to the Socialists. The elections will hardly bring
fresh blood into the legislature supposed to be the most influential branch
of power following the political reform next year.

[Brzezinski]- What I see astonishes and disappoints me. Since the political
crisis of several months ago, the Orange Revolution leaders have not taken
any steps to mobilize the new generation’s energy. I do not mean university
students. I mean those who are 40-45 years old today.

[ZN]- Speaking at a conference on the Ukrainian situation in Washington, you
argued that “too many compromises can cause indigestion.” Neither
Yushchenko’s team nor that of Akhmetov-Yanukovych rules out a possibility
for them to form a coalition in the next Parliament: “President Yushchenko –
Premier Yanukovych.” Do you think it will be a viable partnership?

[Brzezinski] – It depends on which of them is going to give up or sacrifice
more. A person with principles always surrenders less than the one with no
principles.

[ZN]- How will this situation be perceived in the West? Will it be
interpreted as a revival of “Kuchmaism”?

[Brzezinski] – Things get more complicated here. This decision could result
in the continuation of the “Ukrainian game” as I call it. This game is about
acquiescence and evasion. Over the years of independence, I have often
visited Ukraine as I have always taken an interest in your country.

So I often met and talked with Ukrainian leaders, on some occasions on
behalf of the U.S. government and American people. Ukrainian leaders always
agreed with what I said. They assured me they understood how critical and
useful the suggested steps were and promised to follow all recommendations.
And they never kept their promises!

It has always been characteristic of the Ukrainian authorities’ behavior. It
could be an influence of the political culture formed over the last 400
years: we have always heard “yes” and saw nothing happening.

[ZN]- In your opinion, on what platform could Yushchenko and Tymoshenko
unite?

[Brzezinski] – Only on the platform of the Orange Revolution ideas and
ideals. In other words, on accelerating the processes of building up a truly
democratic Ukraine that will become part and parcel of a larger Europe. I
always insist on it because I am sentimentally and strategically committed
to Ukraine. And I am positive that as soon as Ukraine turns into a truly
democratic and truly European nation, Russia will have to follow suit.

Therefore, from the European perspective, Ukraine’s mission transcends
Ukraine per se. Ukraine, successful in democratic and European terms, is a
prerequisite for the formation of a transcontinental Europe.

Ukraine a la Yanukovych, Ukraine of the bandit oblast type, will eventually
reinforce negative residual trends in Russia. In this case, Russia will
establish itself as a quasi transnational state with a dominating
nationalist or, more accurately, “nashist” ideology, snowballing
controversies and a host of mini-Chechnyas. In the long run, this Russia
will lose the Far East and Siberia to China.

Do you remember de Gaul’s famous words about Europe up to the Urals? Most
probably, it was a poetic image, but the general must have meant that Russia
belonged to Europe. The historical irony is that the Urals could be the edge
of Europe if Russia lost or handed over to China all its territories beyond
those mountains.

I think a real hope and a historical prospect for Europe is the Europe
reaching from its western-most point in Portugal – Carbo da Roca – to
Kamchatka. In this arrangement, Ukraine is a core on which the strength of
Europe’s meaningful enlargement will hinge.

The existence of a democratic European Ukraine will encourage “Russia up to
Kamchatka” to become part of Europe. That is why the Orange Revolution
has a global, worldwide significance.

I think Ukraine has a higher level of political culture than Russia.
Ukrainians have a much clearer national self-identification. Political
culture in Russia is still retrograde, for the most part. There is still
havoc in opinions as to what Russia is: is it a nation, an idea, a universal
revolution or a great state? If the propagated ideology of “nashism,” akin
to Nazism, prevails in Russia, it will be suicidal for that country. That is
why Ukraine’s positive example and advancement are so important.

[ZN]- Today Ukraine still relies heavily on Russian natural gas for economic
survival. So far the gas price negotiations have yielded no results. Under
the circumstances, should Ukraine “needle” Russia by initiating the creation
of a democratic belt along its border?

Earlier this week, Kyiv hosted the summit of the Community of Democratic
Choice attended by eight presidents. The Kremlin regards the new project as
entirely and explicitly anti-Russian. Should Ukraine have initiated it given
its economically vulnerable position?

[Brzezinski] – I do not think the idea of promoting democracy is
anti-Russian. After all, one cannot develop policy looking back at the third
parties’ likely reaction to or interpretation of this policy. But one should
pursue this policy cautiously. A lot of people in Russia want to see their
country a democratic state. I think it is vital that nobody substitute
democratic policy with anti-Russian one. It is particularly important in the
context of a larger Europe embracing both a democratic Ukraine and a
democratic Russia.

As for the energy policy and its tactical dimensions, Russia is in no
position to dictate its will to Ukraine as the major part of its oil and gas
go via your territory. Besides, by trying to blackmail Ukraine, Russia will,
de facto, be blackmailing Europe. I do not think it is to Russia’s best
interest.

[ZN]- Russia’s international role is intensifying in view of its plentiful
natural resources, such as oil and gas. Half of European countries are their
consumers. The U.S. leadership can fully appreciate the strategic importance
of oil. Strategic power of the energy-supplying states will be growing every
year.

The trend is observed towards greater European dependence on Russian power
supplies and a deeper penetration of Russian public and private capital into
the European economy. Won’t Ukraine become a bargaining chip in strategic
relations between Washington and Moscow or Brussels and Moscow?

[Brzezinski] – I do not think it will happen. You are speaking of obvious
things. Yet there are factors at work, which are less obvious. For example,
look at a growing interdependence: Russia gets some influence in the West as
the latter partially hinges on its hydrocarbons; but Russia also gets
increasingly dependent on the West for markets and investments in its
economy.

Today, any further growth in oil and gas production and energy generation

is impossible without Western investments, technology, and know-how.
Therefore, I optimistically believe in long-standing relations between
Russia and Europe. I do not see any serious and objective grounds for
the manifestation of Russian imperial ambitions.

We could observe some of those in Chechnya and, to some extent, in Belarus
but that would be it. If Russia pays attention to China and India, it will
notice that 35 million of its citizens live in the Far East and Siberia,
while the territory of an equal size to its south is a home to 3.5 billion
people.

Both China and India are enhancing their economic and military might. In
order to survive as a state, Russia has to become part of Europe. And for
Russia to become part of Europe, Ukraine has to turn up there first.

[ZN]- You know, very few people in the EU seem to regard Russia and Ukraine
as close to them, in Christian, societal, and cultural terms. Europe should
think of its expansion as a civilization. For that, it should attract Russia
and Ukraine, pull them towards itself. Yet this understanding requires
broader horizons.

[Brzezinski] – You are right, few people think of anything but themselves,
their own life today or tomorrow, at the longest. Thinking and discussing
long-time prospects are the responsibilities of persons with a geo-strategic
vision. When 45 years ago de Gaul spoke of Europe stretching up to the
Urals, he sounded unrealistic. What I am saying today can sound equally
unrealistic. Yet some of your readers will still be alive in 2050, and they
will be able to judge if I was realistic or unrealistic in my forecast.

[ZN]- And the other readers will probably recollect your predictions as to
the USSR collapse and will pay closer attention to your today’s words.

[Brzezinski] – We will see.

[ZN]- Sir, do you think it wise of the West to impose such an austere
blockade against Belarus? Shouldn’t it engage in a more active dialogue with
Lukashenko?

[Brzezinski] – It is a sensitive issue. On the one hand, I support the
blockade. On the other, I advocate enticing. My policy towards the former
Soviet bloc was based on these two methods. I knew that, on the one hand,
the Soviet Union would not let the West have an upper hand in their struggle
for leadership but, on the other, the Soviet elite was very susceptible to
Western temptations. That elite was internally vulnerable. They wanted to
have contacts with the West, to be invited to the White House, etc, etc,
etc.

I met with younger Belarussians. I think the young generation is
increasingly identifying itself with the Belarussian nation, with the whole
country. Moreover, some of the Belarusian officials with whom I met felt
uncomfortable about the Russian-Belarusian confederation. For example,
Belarusian ambassadors do not want to be consuls in the Russian diplomatic
service.

[ZN]- Please, answer as candidly as you can: has Georgia become a more
democratic state over the two years since their Rose Revolution”?

[Brzezinski] – Democratization is a process, even in the US. Two hundred
years ago, we adopted a democratic constitution, but as recently as 80 years
ago our women could not vote. Forty years ago most black Americans,
de-facto, had no suffrage.

Looking at democracy as a process, one can state honestly: there is much
more democracy in Georgia today than there was two years ago. Yet it is
still not a fully sustainable democracy. It is still dominated by
personified impulses. Saakashvili is a very charismatic person. He is more
like Tymoshenko than Yushchenko.

[ZN]- Mr. Brzezinski, is Yushchenko a politician that the post-revolutionary
Ukraine needs? Or isn’t he?

[Brzezinski] – Yes and no. Maidan and Ukraine in general needed a leader who
could bring them together, unite them. Yushchenko had this opportunity
because he is a genuinely democratic person. On the other hand, one should
be very careful not to cross the line of conciliation beyond which there is
a territory of opportunism.

This line is very subtle. Maidan was not the beginning of something apt to
grow into a bloody revolution. Had blood been shed, the country would have
had a different leader, a more passionate one, perhaps.

[ZN] – Ukraine can benefit a lot from economic cooperation with Iran.
However, the U.S. stance over Iran often impedes the development of these
relations. The state’s maturity can be gauged by its leaders’ capacity to
strike a balance between promoting universal human values, on the one hand,
and fostering useful economic relations, on the other. What is the right way
to reach maturity without running to extremes?

[Brzezinski]- There are no boundaries that could not be drawn on the map.
And there is always a balance of interests. I think some sort of agreement
between the West and Iran should be achieved. I do not support Iran’s
complete isolation.

It could bring about a unification of Iranian nationalism and Islamic
fundamentalism. The more contacts exist between the West and Iran, the
sooner and the more readily Iranian nationalism will divorce with Iranian
fundamentalism.

[ZN]- We have discussed Russia’s prospects 50 years from now. Looking
at the near future, how do you visualize Russia after Putin?

[Brzezinski] – I think the overall tendency will be negative. Russia will
strive to adopt a more authoritarian and chauvinistic style of political
self-identification. Nostalgia will be fueled by many people’s Soviet
mindset and understanding of the “great state” or “great Russia.”

However, I think it will be the last sigh, the last gasp of the Soviet
Union. As soon as the KGB generation leaves the political arena in 10-15
years, we will see real and drastic political reforms in Russia. There is a
large gap behind the KGB generation, but it will, in due course, be filled
in by a new Russian leadership that would evolve in a different political
environment expediting different values.

It will be a generation much more open to the outer world. Within this time,
hundreds of thousands of people will graduate from Western universities. I
won’t be surprised if in 2015 or 2020 we see a Russian president who is a
product the Harvard School of Business, rather than of the KGB school.

[ZN]- Kaddafi graduated from an American military academy, didn’t he?

[Brzezinski] – Well, he is a military officer. The Russian elite’s
psychology is undergoing profound qualitative transformations. The people
who, ascending to the top of government, will know that they are going to be
the elite of a super power, will feel and look different.

A generation will surface that will realize Russia can be successful only if
its neighbors respect it, instead of hating it as is often the case today;
when its largest neighbors such as Europe, America, or China have good
relations with it and if Russia becomes ever more included in Europe, which
will enable it to preserve its territorial integrity. This is a fundamental
geo-strategic reality for Russia.

[ZN]- How should Ukraine live through these 10-15 years?

[Brzezinski] – It is easy for an outsider to give advice. First of all, the
Orange Revolution goals should be realized as soon as possible. You cannot
let anybody divide yourselves; you should not accept compromises that could
jeopardize the country’s future.

But frankly speaking, only Ukrainians can save Ukraine. A country relying on
rescue efforts from abroad usually fails to survive. Your country’s future
is in Ukrainians’ hands. For the first time ever! For the first time in
Ukraine’s long history!

It is the first generation of Ukrainians who, despite certain weaknesses and
dependencies, have assumed responsibility for their homeland. Do not look at
Moscow, do not look at Washington: just do everything to become a European
state.

[ZN]- But we have “two Ukraines.”

[Brzezinski] – Maybe, and maybe not. My impression is that people in the
east of Ukraine feel something like this: “Decisions for my country should
be made in Kyiv rather than in any other northern city.” I hope I am right,
and if I am not – it is neither my mistake nor my fault.

Still, I believe that something fundamental happened here last year, for the
first time. There appeared a feeling of Ukrainian national predestination.
Now you need leaders able to mobilize the people’s new energy and implement
your plans. I won’t give you the names. Ukraine knows them.
—————————————————————————————————
LINK: http://www.mirror-weekly.com/ie/show/575/51983/
———————————————————————————————

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